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YourBittorrent - P2P/Download News



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Efforts to make pirate sites harder to access have resulted in two new waves of blocking in the UK. Action by Elsevier and Springer Nature now requires major ISPs to block several additional Sci-Hub-related domains while the efforts of the MPA require them to block domains that facilitate access to previously blocked sites including EZTV, SolarMovie, Icefilms, and more.

For well over a decade, copyright holders have been obtaining injunctions around the world to have copyright-infringing sites blocked by Internet service providers.

The belief is that when users are presented with this roadblock, they will be more likely to turn to licensed services instead.

At the time of writing, more than 40 countries either have blocking measures in place or are required to implement them. These include members of the European Union plus Argentina, Australia, Iceland, India, Israel, Liechtenstein, Malaysia, Mexico, Norway, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, ...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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The academic community platform ResearchGate has removed 200,000 files in response to a wave of copyright complaints from publishers ACS and Elsevier. The takedowns go against ResearchGate's open-access philosophy but, legally, it saw no other option than to comply.

One of the core pillars of academic research is sharing. By letting other researchers know what you do, ideas are criticized, improved upon, and extended.

Unfortunately, it’s not always easy for academics to share their work. Most of the top publications are monetized by major publishers, which means that they are locked behind a paywall.

To make their work easier to access, many researchers place copies of their work on their personal profiles, often hosted by their university. There are also more organized ways to share research, by using ResearchGate for example.

Rese...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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Several large live streaming sites sued by DISH Network for breaching the anti-circumvention provisions of the DMCA have gone dark. SportsBay, the largest of the quartet, had around nine million visitors per month but an order issued by a Texas court requiring third-parties to hand over details of its operator may have set off alarm bells.

Most pirate IPTV services online today operate by accessing official broadcasts and streams, capturing them with dedicated equipment, and then restreaming video to the public from dedicated servers.

However, a US lawsuit filed late July shows that’s not the only way.

DISH Sues ‘SportsBay’ Sites

In an interesting complaint filed in a Texas court, DISH claimed that four sites doing business as SportsBay.org, SportsBay.tv, Live-NBA.stream, and Freefeds.com were offering sports broadcasts including the Olympics, NBA matches, NFL games, cricket and motorsports, w...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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Internet provider Wide Open West, better known as WOW!, has responded to a piracy liability lawsuit recently filed by several filmmakers. The Internet provider brands the movie companies as copyright trolls and asks the Colorado federal court to dismiss their complaint. According to Wow!, the rightsholders failed to back up their claims.

Over the past two decades, online piracy has proven a massive challenge for the entertainment industries.

Some copyright holders have tried to go after individual pirates in court but, increasingly, third-party intermediaries are targeted as well.

There are several lawsuits pending in US Courts, where rightsholders accused Internet providers of not doing enough to stop piracy. One of the main allegations is that ISPs fail to terminate accounts of repeat infringers in ‘appropriate circumstances’, as is required under the DMCA.

These lawsuits were pioneered ...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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For the past five years, piracy release site Snahp.it has provided information and links to all kinds of pirated content including movies and TV shows. The site operated in the so-called DDL niche, relying on content hosted elsewhere to service its users. Citing safety and security concerns, the site has now shut down, despite healthy levels of traffic.

At the turn of the century when server bandwidth was at a premium, peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing stepped in to solve the problem. Rather than a small number of individuals having to foot the bill, sharers picked up their own parts of the traffic tab by sharing content with their peers.

In the mid-2000s, server bandwidth became much more affordable and as the years progressed, storing media for direct delivery to end-users became a much more viable option. This gap in the market was serviced by early pioneers including Megaupload and Rapidshare but that was just the beginning of a m...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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The makers of popular films including "Hunter Killer," "Automata," and “I Feel Pretty” are demanding over $10 million in piracy damages from VPN provider LiquidVPN. The movie companies ask the court to issue a default judgment since the VPN provider failed to show up in court. Meanwhile, LiquidVPN's website seems to have disappeared.

A few years ago piracy-related lawsuits were pretty straightforward. Copyright holders would either sue alleged file-sharers or the operators of pirate sites.

In recent months, we have seen a new breed of lawsuits filed on behalf of the makers of movies such as “Hunter Killer,” “Automata,” “Survivor,” and “I Feel Pretty.”

These lawsuits target VPN providers, which are generally seen as third-party intermediaries. This includes LiquidVPN. The company was taken to court in March, shortly after the former owner was sued in a separate lawsuit.

The c...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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A just unsealed grand jury indictment places YouTuber Bill Omar Carrasquillo (Omi in a Hellcat) and two other men at the heart of a massive conspiracy to illegally obtain Comcast, Verizon, Charter and other TV services' content and distribute it to the public via several Gears-branded pirate IPTV services. According to the US government, the defendants made at least $34m.

A little under two years ago, the federal government shut down Gears-branded IPTV services operated by Bill Omar Carrasquillo (aka Omi in a Hellcat).

IRS and FBI agents seized “at least” $5.2m from his bank accounts along with a laundry list of supercars and other vehicles, alleged to have been purchased with revenues from Carrasquillo’s TV services.

As the government works to take possession of those assets in a civil process, the long-awaited criminal indictment has now landed. Unsealed last evening, it attempts to drive a coach and horses through CarrasquilloR...

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After being founded in 2006, RLSLOG grew to become the largest and most recognized pirate 'release blog' on the Internet. In the years that followed RLSLOG weathered many legal storms and even referrals to the USTR, but today the founder of RLSLOG confirms that after 15 years, the site has thrown in the towel.

Founded in 2006, RLSLOG.net was one of the pioneers of the ‘release blog’ format. When it first launched, visitors were able to read about the latest pirate releases, who had placed them online and, importantly, what the files were called.

Unlike so-called ‘pre databases’ that displayed only raw information, new releases on RLSLOG were presented in an article format with comments on the quality, source (such as DVDSCR or the now largely defunct Telecine), runtime, IMDB rating and format (Xvid, for example). Music was also broadly covered along with apps, games and oth...

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Canada's Federal Court of Appeals has revived a reverse class-action lawsuit from Voltage Pictures, which plans to go after alleged BitTorrent pirates. The lower court rejected this approach, as it would not suitable for file-sharing cases, but in a unanimous decision, the Court of Appeals sees things differently.

Movie studio Voltage Pictures has gone after alleged movie pirates for many years now.

The company and its subsidiaries have filed numerous lawsuits against alleged pirates in the United States, Australia, and Europe, which likely brought in substantial revenues.

Last week, we reported that Voltage just launched a new legal campaign in the UK. At the same time, there is news coming from Canada as well, where Voltage hopes to hold alleged pirates responsible through a novel strategy.

Reverse Class-action Against BitTorrent Pirates

In Canada, Voltage is attempting to obt...

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Virgin Media subscribers receiving letters accusing them of movie piracy may find that settling their cases will be a costly affair. TorrentFreak understands that settlement demands run to several thousand pounds, a massive uplift on the several hundred usually requested in similar cases. Interestingly, however, some subscribers could be immune from being sued.

Last week TorrentFreak broke the news that Voltage Holdings LLC, a company well known for tracking down pirates worldwide, has obtained a High Court order compelling Virgin Media to hand over subscriber data.

As a result, some of the ISP’s subscribers have begun receiving letters accusing them of pirating the movie ‘Ava’ with the advice that if the matter goes to court, they could be found liable for copyright infringement. Of course, this is something Voltage and its partners would prefer to avoid and to that end, are offering recipients the option to admit liabili...

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